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Preparing Your Home for a Hailstorm

Hail causes about $1 billion in damage to property each year, according to the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While you can’t stop a hailstorm from doing damage, you can reduce the amount of damage a storm can do. There are a few ways to prepare your home and outdoor items for a hail storm.

Preparing in Advance

If you have trees near your home, they should be trimmed regularly. Keep an eye out for any branches that could potentially fall on your home during a storm. Getting rid of these branches can greatly reduce your risk of damage, because hail is more likely to break these branches than rain. Hail is denser than rain and it hits with more force, so it can easily crack branches.

Next, you should get your roof inspected to make sure there isn’t anything that could make the roof particularly susceptible to hail damage. It’s best to repair the roof as problems are found, instead of waiting for multiple parts of the roof to need repairing. Fixing it right away can help prevent some damage from hail.

Preparing for an Approaching Storm

When a potential hail storm is heading toward your home there are a few ways you can work to reduce or contain the amount of damage caused by hail. If the storm is far enough away from your home that it doesn’t pose an immediate threat, a good first step for preparing is putting your cars, RV, boats, recreational vehicles, and other expensive items in a covered area. Putting large objects, such as patio furniture and garbage cans, into a covered area is a good second step. These items can cause serious damage to your home if the wind picks up and they are left outside. Large items are best stored in an enclosed area, such as a shed or garage.

One final step to prepare for the storm is to close all the windows in your home and doors that lead outside. Closing any curtains in front of the windows can help contain flying glass. This is especially important if your family takes shelter anywhere near a window in your home.

Some information from: Insurance Information Institute